Thursday, October 9, 2014

Kenton Ghost Hunt

I’m sure that everyone is aware of the multiple spellings of many surnames.  While researching the surname Langston I came across a gentleman named Langton, in the Oregonian newspaper out of Portland, Oregon dated Sunday, January 5, 1913. The title of the article sparked my curiosity and just to verify if this was another spelling of Langston I had to check it out.  I got excited thinking that Langton could be a ghost hunter. Turns out he saw a ghost and decided to change his direction of travel and went the other direction. It might not be the correct surname but it’s still an interesting article for this time of year. 
‘KENTON GHOST’ HUNTED
PHANTOM-LIKE VISITOR DIS-
TURBS PENINSULA.
Mysterious Creation Lurks Along
Patton Road by Night and Van-
ishes by day, Is Report. 

  The “Kenton ghost,” if there is one
in that section of the city, had better
take to the cemetery if he wants to
enjoy life, for last night W. M. Kil-
ingsworth, Percy Conger and Dalles
M. Simonsen inaugurated the first of
a series of “ghost hunts” in hopes that
they may catch it, or lay it.
  William Adams and Jack Langton,
of the Peninsula district, say they saw
a ghost, or a mysterious person.
Wednesday evening as they drove
along Patton Road near Lombard
Street. The “ghost” was seated on a
stump, and Adams, to make sure he
was there, spoke to “the ghost,”
who is a smooth personage, glided
away. Adams and Langton took the
opposite course.
  “The ghost” was seen by Thomas
O’Rourke, of Derby and Kilpatrick
streets, a week ago. Mr. O’Rourke de-
scribes it as six feet high, so thin that
his bones show through his skin, and
pale as whitewash.
  “I came along the other evening,”
said Mr. O’Rourke, “and right before
me, near a tree, was this peculiar ob-
ject. I would have spoken to it, but
didn’t care to get into an argument
so said nothing.
  “Just then he vanished. I didn’t have
a gun with me, but I spoke to Police-
man Dick Stewart, whom I met 13
blocks away, a minute later. Stewart
said that he’d get him, and hurried
off.”
  Mrs. W. A. Willis, wife of Secretary
Willis, of the Portland Cattle Loan
Company, who lives in Kenton, told
her husband that she had seen a tall,
fat man three months ago. His actions
were such that she now knows that he
was a ghost, and thinks perhaps the
Kenton ghost is the same one, starving.
  Neil O’Hare, proprietor of the Ken-
ton salon, when asked for information
said: “Divil a bit do I know about any
ghost. Men came to my place and tell
 me about things they have seen the
 night before and they are such a va-
riety of everything that seeing ghosts
is tame in comparison.”
  J. H. Nolta, a member of the Inter-
state Bridge Commission, is said to
have seen the ghost. Mr. Nolta told
a friend that he had seen a most pe-
culiar being in a shanty some time ago,
and he is not over sorry that he did
not investigate.
  People in Kenton, now keep their
doors tightly locked at night, and or-
ders are said to be issued calling for
the capture of the intruder, dead or
alive. To see a ghost is one thing,
but to capture a ghost is another; per-
haps that is why those who have seen
Kenton’s mysterious visitor have been
unable to bring about his capture.