Saturday, May 21, 2016

GenBiz Solutions - Genealogy:"A Mobile Career" Customer Service on the Move

Last month I was asked if I would be interested in contributing a blog posting with the 2016 GenBiz Solutions Blog site.  I had to stop and think about what I could contribute.  Their focus is on offering guides and ideas to those genealogists who want to start business or currently have and established business and ways to increase the business.   I took some time to visit their site, a couple of times because they have some wonderful guest bloggers who have a wealth of information. After some thought as to what I could possible contribute, I felt sharing the way I’ve tuned my genealogy business into a “Mobile Career” business was one that could be of some interest.  Who knew that I would have so much to share that it would be turned into a series of blog posts?  This whole series is so much fun to write and I’m excited to let you know that the first post was released on Friday the 20th of May.   When you’re visiting their site be sure to the posts, they all offer some useful pieces of information that I’m sure many will find very useful. 

 Professional genealogist Angie Rodesky starts a new series of articles at GenBiz Solutions entitled "Genealogy: A Mobile Career"

Genealogy: “A Mobile Career” – Customer Service on the Move[Editor’s Note:  Professional genealogist Angie Rodesky is owner of ARodesky Genealogy.]

Series Introduction – Genealogy: “A Mobile Career”Moving to a new city, state or country for that matter can be exciting and scary all in the same breath. Now having to add the relocation of your business into that move mix can add some extra anxiety. What is that old saying, “Don’t sweat the small stuff”? Well that doesn’t work in this scenario. There isn’t anything small about making a move like this, especially when you have an established genealogy business. Not only do you have to........(more) 

 

Monday, April 4, 2016

FaceBook Surprise

     I received a wonderful surprise over Spring break and couldn’t wait to share it.  I would say many of us are familiar with FaceBook and even have an account, but then I remembered my own husband doesn’t. The thought of having to take time to communicate with everyone and read the ongoing lines of political drama, personal drama and game advertisement isn’t appealing to many. But in this case this particular FaceBook page paid off.

     You can find genealogy, county and family history pages; I joined some pages that I have a family research connection to. It was on one of these pages I posted a scanned photograph of one page from our family bible and a photograph of my great grandmother posing with three other ladies and a small girl. I knew the names of those in the picture and simple just wanted to share something I had. Yes I like fishing sometimes, that fishing trip paid off. I received a reply to that posting from a nice lady who basically wanted to know who I was and how I had a photograph of her mother and grandmother. I replied with my answer as to who I was, how I obtained the photograph and my relationship to those in the photograph. She couldn’t believe it and neither could I, she was my mom’s cousin, we continued sending messages back a forth for a couple hours. She shared memories she had playing with my mom on my great-grandparents farm. I couldn’t wait to tell my mom and she couldn’t wait to get in touch with her and reconnect. It turns out that they hadn’t seen or spoken to each other in over 50 years and now they are sharing old memories and making new ones. Guess what I’m included and now have additional family members to connect with and learn more about my family, and their memories of my ancestors. We have all exchanged photographs; my mom and my great cousin are now looking forward to seeing each other face to face again. Oh yes, you best believe I will be there also.

Essie Mae Clinton, Flossie Clinton, Jennie Clinton and Sue Clinton

     Who knew FaceBook would play such a roll in our genealogy research.  If you haven’t look into adding FaceBook to your research toolbox I recommend you give it a try. Who knows you might receive a message similar to mine.   

Sunday, April 3, 2016

Sunday Cemetery - Veterans Cemetery Assignments

Published on the 1st of May in 1904 in the Philadelphia Inquires out of Philadelphia, PA
NEWS OF INTEREST TO THE VETERANS
CEMETERY ASSIGNMENTS FOR LOCAL POSTS ON MEMORIAL DAY ARE ANNOUNCED
GENERAL OSTERHAUS TO BE GIVEN RECERTION BY THE DEPARTMENT COMMANDER
     The commanders of the Philadelphia Grand Army posts announce the following assignments to cemeteries for Memorial Day: George G. Meade Post, No. 1, is assigned to North, South and Central Laurel Hill; Post 2 will hold services at Monument Cemetery. General U. S. Grant Post, No. 5, will visit All Saints’, the Philadelphia side of Mount Moriah, and St. James’, the Old Swedes, Burial Ground at Sixty-ninth and Woodland avenue. Ellis Post, No. 6, will decorate the graves of comrades buried in the cemeteries of Germantown and the Chelten Hills. Camp No. 9, of the Sons of Veterans, will assist them at Holy Sepulchre and Ivy Hill Cemeteries. Captain Walter S. Newhall Post, No. 8, will visit the Palmer and Hanover Cemeteries, and decorate the W. S. Newhall Monument. Glenwood Cemetery will be visited by General E. D. Baker Post, No. 8.
     Lieutenant John T. Greble Post, No. 10, is assigned to St. Paul’s and Lafayette Cemeteries. Hetty A. Jones Post, No. 12, of Roxborough, will visit the Leverington, St. Timothy’s and the Presbyterian, Lutheran and also the Hetty Jones monument. Colonel Ulric Dahlgren Post, No. 14, is assigned to Greenmount, Laurel Hill, St. Michael’s and New Cathedral Cemeteries, and the grave of Colonel Dahlgren. General G. K. Warren Post, No. 15, Manayunk, will decorate the graves of comrades at the German Reformed, St. David’s, St. John’s, German Catholic and the Presbyterian Cemetery, at Manayunk. Colonel W. L. Curry Post, No. 18, will observe the day at the south side of Fernwood Cemetery, and at Colonel W. L. Curry’s grave; South Laurel Hill. The services at the Od Fellows’ Cemetery will be in charge of Colonel Fred Taylor Post, No. 19. Courtland Saunders Post, No. 21, is assigned to Woodland and Cathedral, the Quaker Cemetery, at Darby, and the Baptist, at Blockley.
     The Hebrew cemetery at Eleventh and Federal streets will be visited by Admiral Dupont Post, No. 24. John W Jackson Post, No. 27, will attend services at Merion Cemetery. The Cavalry Post, No. 35, is assigned to West Laurel Hill Cemetery and the McClellan monument. Colonel Gus W. Town Post, No. 46, will decorate graves at Ronaldson, Philanthropic, St. Peter’s, at Third and Pine streets, and the Old Pine Street Church burial grounds. Captain Philp R. Schuyler Post, No. 51, is assigned to Franklin, St. Ann’s, Belleview, St. Peter’s and Holy Redeemer Cemeteries. General Phil Kearney Post, NO. 55, will decorate graves at St. Joachim’s, Cedar Hill. North Cedar Hill, Cheltenham, Oxford Church, Pennypack, Bridesburg, Magnolia and Bustieton Cemeteries. The graves of comrade in the west side of Mt. Moriah and also at Graceland Cemetery will be decorated by Colonel John W. Moore Post, No. 56. General D. R. Birney Post, No. 63, will visit Oakland and Knights of Pythias Cemeteries, and also the grave of General D. B. Birney. General John F. Reynolds Post, No. 71 is assigned to Old Swedes, Union, Mutual and Whatron Street Cemeteries, and to the Reynolds monument. Post 77 will go to Olney. The graves of Union soldiers at Wilmot and Bethel Cemeteries will be decorated by Robert Bryan Post, No. 80. The observance of the day at American Mechanics’ Cemetery will be in charge of Anna M. Ross Post, No. 94. Olive Cemetery will be visited by Charles Summer Post, No. 103. Winfield Scott Post, No. 114, will visit Mt. Vernon and St. James the Less Cemeteries. General John A. Logan Post, No. 115, is assigned to the Baptist Cemetery at Broad street and Passyunk avenue, and also at Trinity Lutheran. General Hector Tyndale Post, No. 160, will decorate graves at Mt. Peace Cemetery and also the grave of General Tyndale at North Laurel Hill. Pennsylvania Reserves Post, No. 191, is assigned to Fifth and Arch streets, Fernwood, Christ Church Cemeteries, and also the tomb of Robert Morris. John A. Koltes Post, No. 228, will visit the German Lutheran Cemetery and grave of Colonel Koltes at Glenwood. General Robert Patterson Post, No. 273, is assigned to St. Mary’s and to the Philadelphia Cemeteries and to General Paterson’s grave at Laurel Hill. Lieutenant Edward W. Gay Post, No. 312, will visit Northwood, Milestown, Baptist and Methodist Cemeteries and the grave of Lieutenant Gay. Colonel James Ashworth Post, No. 334, of Frankford, will decorate graves at the Methodist, Presbyterian, Mt. Smai, Hedge Street, Holmesburg, All Saints’, Collegeville, German Hill and Torresdale Cemeteries, and also the grave of Colonel Ashworth at Cedar Hill, as well as Section 6 at that cemetery. The services at the National Cemetery at Germantown will be in charge of General T. C. Donovan Post, No. 363. Naval Post, No. 400, will visit the Mt. Moriah Naval Plot and St. Mary’s Fourth and Spruce streets.
     Department Commander Walton and his staff will tender a reception to Major General Osterhaus, who is now visiting America for the first time since the Civil War, at the German Society Hall, Seventh and Spring Garden streets, Tuesday evening. All veterans are requested to attend the affair in Grand Army uniform.


Saturday, April 2, 2016

April's History

Appeared in Grand Forks Daily Herald out of Grand Forks, North Dakota on April 16 1898 
APRIL IN AMERICAN HISTORY
April is an eventful month in American history. Thirty-seven years ago, two days after the firing of the shot that initiated the bloody battles of our civil war. Fort Sumpter surrendered. Thirty-three years ago Abraham Lincoln, who exhausted every honorable means to avert that conflict, and whose statesmanship saved the republic, was assassinated. The fatal shot was fired on the night of April 14 and death ensued on the following day.

April witnessed both the beginning and the end of the war of the rebellion: Sumter was fired upon on April 12, 1861, and Lee surrendered to Grant April 9, 1865. The same is true of the revolutionary war; the battle of Lexington was fought on April 19, 1775, and the preliminary treaty of peace with Great Britain was ratified by congress on April 15, 1783. The Mexican war began in the same month, the first battle being fought on April 23, 1846.

Three momentous events in our earlier history have their dates in the month of April; the first congress met on April 6, George Washington was inaugurated president on April 30 of the same year and the navy department was organized on April 30, 1798. It was on the last day of April, 1803, that the treaty was made with France for our purchase of Louisiana.

The necrology of the month is too voluminous to be considered, but from the list of earth’s greatest who died in April may be singled out the name of Benjamin Franklin, philosopher, statesman, scientist, patriot and father of the printing craft.


As a natal month of historic events April has a fruitful record, and at the rate we are now making history the April of 1898 will contain many important additions. –Chicago Times Herald. 

Friday, April 1, 2016

Follow Friday

You never know what you might have missed while searching the web and reading all your messages that’s why I enjoy sharing some of these blogs. I’ve not listed them in any particular order just wanted so share some that caught my attention. Enjoy!

A Home in Missouri – “They Call My Name”
posted on March 14, 2016
posted by Denise Muhammad

A Southern Sleuth – “In Your Easter Bonnet”
posted on March 29,2016
posted by Michelle Ganus Taggart

Gena’s Genealogy – “Women’s History Month 2016: Tip #28 What’s HER Name??”
posted on March 29, 2016
posted by Gena Philibert-Ortega

How Did I Get Here? My Amazing Genealogy Journey – “Fearless Females: Genealogy Trading Card for Carrie Ethel Whitney Harrison”
posted on March 29, 2016
posted by Andrea Kelleher

South Carolina Pioneers – “Marlboro County Probate Records”
posted on March 25, 2016
posted by Jeannette Austin
http://southcarolinapioneers.blogspot.com/2016/03/marlboro-co-sc-genealogy-records-wills.html

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday - Walter and Susie Brown

A couple years ago I was doing some research for a client at Golden Hill Cemetery in Montgomery County, Clarksville, Tennessee. This is one of the many cemeteries that are in despair and in need of some love and attention. I took many photographs of some the tombstones and thought I would include some of them in my "Tombstone Tuesday" postings. 


WALTER               SUSIE A.
BROWN               BROWN
                                                1876-1926               1876-


[1]1910 United States Federal Census from Montgomery County in the state of Tennessee, address listed  is Post Royal Road, Louis Wimberly is head of household, married, black, male, was born abt. 1850 in Tennessee, fathers birth place was Virginia and mothers Tennessee. It shows is occupation as Farmer on General Farm, owns his home, farm, he is able to read and write, has been married for 30 years, he was 60 years of age. Dora Wimberly wife to head of household, married, black, female, was born abt. 1860 in Tennessee and both parents were born in Tennessee. No occupation is listed, she was able to read and write, married for 30 years, gave birth to 10 children and 8 are living, she was 50 years of age. Susana Wimberly daughter to head of household, single, black, female, was born abt. 1882 in Tennessee and both parents born in Tennessee. Her occupation is teacher in public school, she was able to read and write, she was 28 years of age. Emmett Wimberly son to head of household, single, black, male, was born abt. 1892 in Tennessee and both parents were born in Tennessee. No occupation listed, attended school and was able to read and write, he was 18 years of age. Patty Wimberly daughter to head of household, single, black, female, was born abt. 1895 in Tennessee and both parents were born in Tennessee. No occupation listed, attended school and was able to read and write, she was 15 years of age. Fennie Wimberly daughter to head of household, single, black, female, was born abt. 1898 in Tennessee and both parents were born in Tennessee. No occupation listed, attended school and was able to read and write, she was 12 years of age. Mamie Wimberly daughter to head of household, single, black, female, born abt. 1901 in Tennessee and both parents born in Tennessee. Attended school, she was 9 years of age.


[2]1920 United States Federal Census from Montgomery County, Clarksville in the state of Tennessee, address listed is 113 St. John Street, Walter Brown listed as head of household, married, black, male, was born abt. 1880 in Alabama and both of his parents were born in Alabama. It shows his occupation was listed as blacksmith, owns a shop and house, was able to read and write, he was 40 years of age. Susanna Brown wife to head of household, married, black, female, born abt. 1880 in Tennessee, both parents born in Tennessee. Her occupation is list as supervisor at a school, she was able to read and write, she was 40 years of age.

 

[3]1930 United States Federal Census from Montgomery County, Clarksville in the state of Tennessee, address listed is 113 St. John Street, Susie Brown is listed as head of household, widowed, negro, female, born abt. 1880 in Tennessee, both parents born in Tennessee. The value of the home she owned was as $3,000, she was 32 years of age when she was first married; she was able to read and write, she didn’t attend school, her occupation was listed as Supervisor in the Colored Public Schools, and she was 50 years of age. Pattie Wimberley is sister to head of household, single, Negro, female, born abt. 1895 in Tennessee, both parents born in Tennessee. She is able to read and write she has attended school, no occupation listed; she was 35 years of age.


[4]Walter Brown, male, colored, married, birth was in 1877 born in Alabama, and his death was May 8, 1926 in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee. Additional information shows he was a blacksmith,   49 years of age at time of death, he died of TB. Date of burial shows 10 May 1926,  place of burial is Golden Hill Cemetery in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee. Informant was Susie Brown at 113 Saint John Street, Clarksville, Tennessee.



[1]1910 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA; Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2006. Civil District 6, Montgomery, Tennessee; Roll: T624-1513; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 0122, FHL microfilm: 1375526    
[2] 1920 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Clarksville Ward 9, Montgomery, Tennessee; Roll: T625_1756; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 157; Image 832.
[3] 1930 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Clarksville, Montgomery, Tennessee; Roll: 2265; Page:9B; Enumeration District: 0022; Image: 776.0, FHL microfilm.
[4] Tennessee, Death and Burials Index, 1874-1955 Ancestry.com.(http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.  

Monday, March 28, 2016

Brass Founder

     Have any of you run across the occupation “Brass Founder”? Recently while doing some research I ran across this occupation, "Brass Founder", and wasn’t familiar with it.  So what did I do, looked it up of course. When I googled the occupation the first item that came up was a disease from the occupation “brass founder fever”. My first thought was this could be along the lines of “gold fever”, not the case as I’m sure some of you know.

     The life of a “brass founder” was one of those occupations that had negative medical long lasting effect for many. They had to work in extreme heat, melting the brass down into a liquid then pouring that scorching hot liquid into mods. As you can imagine this was a hazardous job having to work with the molten brass and extreme heat.  Many who held this occupation suffered from permanent discoloration of the skin. The disease I mentioned earlier is a common illness with this occupation, due to the inhalation of particles and fumes during the process.

     On this short quest in finding out more about this occupation I discovered one apprentice who was lucky enough to be chosen to work on the Liberty Bell. John Stow was only four years out of his brass founder apprenticeship when he received the notification about his new job.  He didn’t do this work alone a fellow founder, John Pass was also chosen to work on the Liberty Bell.  When looking at the Liberty Bell you will see their names right above the bell crack.   


Sunday, March 27, 2016

Sunday Cemetery No Room in the Cemetery

Published on the 21st of January in 1908 in the Wilkes-Barre Times Leader out of Wilkes-Barre, PA
CATHOLICS MAY SELECT ANY PLOT
Germans Have No Room For Cemetery
GIVEN SPECIAL PERMISSIION
DARLING STREET BURIAL PLOT FILLED AND NO NEW ONES ARE AVAILABLE
     Inability upon the part of Monsigner Nagel, pastor of St Nicholas German Catholic church, to find a suitable plot in which to bury the dad of his congregation has led the clergyman to announce to the members of this flock that hereafter they may secure a lot in any cemetery they desire and that when the interment is made a priest will be sent to bless the ground.
     The announcement of Mongsignor Nagel came as a surprise to the members of the church.
     During the pas t few years the Darling street cemetery has filled up rapidly until at the present time there are few available lots. Last year Monsignor Nagel made an effort to purchase several properties but without success.
     It was planned to secure a plot near the Hanover Catholic cemetery, but when the negotiations were about closed it was ascertained that the Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal company are to start operations in the vicinity and this plan had to be abandoned.

     After searching the city and vicinity for a site Monsignor Nagel decided that an available one could not be found and according announced to the congregation that this being the case he was privileged to allow them to bury their dead in any cemetery where they might purchase lots and that when the burial was made a priest would bless the ground. 

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Saturday Spotting - Cholera Ship


Published on the 6th of January in 1854 in the Delaware State Reporter out of Dover, DE

CHOLERA, - The ship New England, with emigrants, has arrived at New Orleans, having had seventy deaths on the passage from cholera. 

Friday, March 25, 2016

Follow Friday


You never know what you might have missed while searching the web and reading all your messages that’s why I enjoy sharing some of these blogs. I’ve not listed them in any particular order just wanted so share some that caught my attention. Enjoy!

Ancestoring- “A fun project from J Paul Hawthorne”
posted on March 24, 2016
posted by Michele Simmons Lewis

Old Bones Genealogy – “M. Thomas, Photographer of Thomas Edison’s Favorite Photo”
posted on March 23, 2016
posted by Eileen A Souza

 Olive Tree Genealogy – “Creating a Family Story and Memory Book”
posted on March 23, 2016
posted by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

The Pioneer/Honeymoon Trail – “Day 1 of 44 – Slagtown (Week 1)”
posted on March 22, 2016
posted by Grant Davis

A Family Tapestry – “Remember the Iceberg”
posted on March 24, 2016
posted by Jacqi Stevens
afamilytapestry.blogspot.com

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Lost But Found Again

As researchers we encounter those wonderful stories of uniting our clients with their family history through the research that we do. That is a wonderful gift, job or tool however you word it, we take pride in what we do and don’t take it lightly. Recently I had to opportunity to reunite someone’s family history with the family. Okay I can see you tilting your head from side to side trying to figure out what on earth I’m talking about.

Some of you are aware as to how I started in genealogy; you might have seen me present or read one of my blog postings about the wonderful things that can be found on the internet to help in your search. One of those sites I’ve mentioned was eBay and searching for family letters to research, blog about or aid in a client’s research.  Well recently while reviewing a purchase made a few years back I realized that the dates on some letters were post stamped in the late 1990’s. As a genealogist I research “for the living” I don’t research the living. I find it exciting to discover a family’s history along with that family member, client.  After noticing the dates I ventured out to research “the living” and see if I could reunite the family with this wonderful collection that I had purchased so many years ago.  What a wonderful feeling it was to speak with a member of the family and discover these were things many family members had never seen.  I had mixed feeling during the end of our phone conversation both of joy and great sadness.  It turned out this family collection had been stolen; yes that was where my sadness entered.  But I quickly found joy in the fact that many years ago I purchased the “lot” of letters, photos and documents and with multiple moves I packed them away in a box for safe keeping. Only to then pull them out a couple weeks ago, locate the family and reunite them with pieces of their family history that they thought were gone forever.  I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again I “LOVE” doing this. 

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday - J. Howard Breed and M. Phebe Jones Breed

Photograph taken by Angela Rodesky, Forest Cemetery, Middletown, Delaware

M. PHEBE JONES
BREED
1860-1926
J. HOWARD BREED
1849-1936


[1]1880 United States Federal Census from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. W.P. Breed head of household, married, white, male, was born abt. 1817 in New York, both parents born in New York. His occupation is listed as Clergyman he was 63 years of age. Rebecca S. Breed, spouse to head of household, married, white, female, was born abt. 1821 in Pennsylvania, both parents born in Pennsylvania. No occupation listed she was 59 years of age.  John H. Breed, son to head of household, single, white, male, was born abt. 1849 in Ohio, father born in New York and mother born in Pennsylvania. His occupation is listed as manufacturer; he was 31 years of age. Ella R. Breed, daughter to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1854 in Ohio, father born in New York and mother born in Pennsylvania. No occupation is listed; she was 26 years of age. Wm. P. Breed, son to head of household, single, white, male, was born abt. 1858 in Pennsylvania, father born in New York and mother in Pennsylvania. Occupation listed as student, he was 22 years of age. Lizzie C. Breed, daughter to head of household, married, white, female, was born abt. 1853 in New York, father born in New York and mother in Pennsylvania. No occupation is listed; she was 27 years of age. The census also shows Cecelia Peterson, servant to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1859 in Sweden, both parents born in Sweden. Her occupation is servant; she was 21 years of age. Bella Clark, servant to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1860 in New Jersey, both parents born in New Jersey. Her occupation is servant; she was 20 years of age. Mary Rose, servant to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1862 in Ohio, both parents born in Ohio. Her occupation is servant; she was 18 years of age. Mary Biney, servant to head of household, married, white, female, was born abt. 1840 in Ireland, both parents born in Ireland. Her occupation is servant; she was 40 years of age. Rachel Scott, cook to the head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1842 in New York, both parents born in Maine. Her occupation is cook; she was 38 years of age.


[2]1880 United States Federal Census from the state of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia County. Thomas J. Jones, head of household, married, white, male, was born abt. 1834 in Delaware, both of his parents were born in Delaware. His occupation is listed as brass founder; he was 46 years of age. Emma T. Jones, wife to head of household, married, white, female, was born abt. 1841 in Delaware, father’s birthplace was Delaware and mother’s birthplace was Pennsylvania. Occupation listed as keeping house, she was 39 years of age. M. Phoebe Jones, daughter to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1861 in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. Occupation listed at home, she was 19 years of age. Lidie M. Jones, daughter to head of household, single, white, female was born abt. 1865 in Pennsylvania, both parents born in Delaware. Occupation listed at school, 15 years of age. Fredrick T. Jones, son to head of house hold, single, white, male, was born abt. 1864 in Pennsylvania,both parents born in Delaware. Occupation listed at school, he was 16 years of age.  Hottie B. Jones, daughter to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1873 in Pennsylvania, both parents born in Delaware. No occupation listed, 7 years of age. Albert H. Jones, son to head of household, single, white, male, was born abt. 1879 in Pennsylvania. No occupation listed, 1 year of age. Mary McAndre, servant to head of household, single, white, female, was born abt. 1860 in Pennsylvania, father was born in Ireland and mother born in England. Occupation listed as servant, she was 20 years of age. 

[3]M. Phebe Jones married J. Howard Breed in Philadelphia Pennsylvania, the year of marriage is 1902, marriage license number 145585.


[4]1910 Untied States Federal Census from state of Pennsylvania, Montgomery County in the township of Whitpain, address listed as 281 State Road North from Central Square, shows J Howard Breed, head of household, married, white, male, was born abt. 1850 in Ohio, his father was born in New York and mother Pennsylvania. It also shows his occupation was listed as Supt with Toust Company, owns his home, he was 60 years of age and in his current marriage for 8 years.  Phebe J. Breed, wife, married, white, female, was born abt. 1861 in Pennsylvania; her father was born in Pennsylvania and mother Maryland. It shows no occupation, she was 49 years of age and in her current marriage for 8 years. No children born or living noted. Dr. Dr Breed, sister to head of household, single, white, female, was born about 1854 in Ohio, her father was born in New York and mother Pennsylvania. It shows her occupation was listed as physician, she was 56 years of age.


[5]1920 United States Federal Census from state of Pennsylvania, Montgomery County in the township of Whitpain, address listed as De Kalb St Pike, shows John Howard Breed, head of household, married, white, male, was born abt. 1850 in Ohio, his father was born in New York and mother in Pennsylvania. It also shows his occupation was listed as Superintendent with Waits in Bank, owns his home, he is 70 years of age and able to read and write. Martha Phebe Breed, wife, married, white, female, was born abt. 1861 in Delaware, her father was born in Delaware and her mother, Emma Thomas Jones was born in Delaware. It shows no occupation, she was 59 years of age and able to read and write.  Emma Thomas Jones, mother-in-law to head of household, widowed, white, female, was born abt. 1841 in Delaware, her fathers was born in Pennsylvania and mother in Delaware. It shows no occupation, she was 79 years of age and able to read and write.


[6]1930 United States Federal Census from the state of Pennsylvania, Montgomery County in the township of Norristown, address listed Swede and Powell Streets in Abington Friends Home, shows Howard Breed, lodger, widowed, white, male, was born abt. 1850 in Ohio, his father was born in New York and mother New York. It shows no occupation, he was 80 years of age.
*There is a Rebecca A. Breed also listed as a lodger directly under Howard, this could be a relation to him as her birth place, the birth place of both parents are the same as Howard.


[7]Certificate of Death in Montgomery County state of Pennsylvania.  J. Howard Breed date of birth May 27, 1849 in Pennsylvania, retired with no occupation, parents were Wm. F. Breed with New York place of birth, Rebecca Murray with Pennsylvania place of birth. Male, white, widowed, was the husband of M. Phoebe Breed. Date of death November 13, 1936, residence was Friends home; he was 87 years of age.  Burial is listed at Middletown, Delaware in Forrest Cemetery, date of burial November 16, 1936. The informant listed on the death certificate is Miss Anna Breed, Friends Home.




[1] 1880 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com; accessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Original data; Roll: 1186; Family History Film: 1255186; Page 190A; Enumeration District: 580; Image: 0378
[2] 1880 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com; accessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Original data: Roll: 1171, Family History Film: 1255171; Page: 478A; Enumeration District: 150; Image: 0425  
[3] Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Marriage Index, 1885-1951 Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. 
[4] 1910 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.comaccessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2006. Original data; Roll T624_1380; Page: 13B; Enumeration District: 0164; FHL microfilm: 1375393. 
[5] 1920 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com; accessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2010. Original data; Roll: T625_1607; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 194; Image: 540.
[6] 1930 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com; accessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2002. Original data; Roll: 2083; Page 23A; Enumeration District: 0103; Image: 755.0; FHL microfilm: 2341817.
[7] Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963 Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com; accessed 10 February 2016) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. 2014. Series 11 90 (1,905 cartons). Records of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Record Group 11, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Monday, March 21, 2016

Medusa Ring?

Is there such a thing as a Medusa ring? That was one of the first questions a few of us had as we viewed this ring last week. I stopped by the Middletown Historical Society Museum on Friday and was surprised and curious, as many of us were, about this ring pictured. Not much is known about this ring except as to who found it and where it was as.  Sean McMenamin a local resident and metal detector enthusiast, who also runs a group called Tri State Hunters here in Delaware.  While working on a piece of proper in Odessa, Delaware he came across this piece. He knows the property that he was working on dates back to 1782. He had spent many hours going over this property finding bottle caps, buttons even some coins but this was defiantly unique. That’s one of the reasons he stopped by to see if we had any thoughts on the piece. He did verify that it’s silver and the stone is jade and at one point it was sized because you could see the section on the back of the band.

The area in Odessa that he was searching was at one time believed to be the location of a tannery. There was an archaeological dig in the area but no proof of the tannery.  One of the other items found within the same area was a 1694 William & Mary copper coin.   He also shared that about 30 yards from the location of the ring was a 1662 Spanish 1 Reale Cob.  So I can’t help but wonder how long has that ring been there. It appears to me that they are two different faces; the hair is different on both faces and the size of the eyes and nose look different also. Now granted some of this could be from wear and tear but the direction of the hair is defiantly different on each face.


We have one member of our society who took a look at the photographs and believes it is Art Nouveau about 1885-1910. She does confirm that it is a female and often a “goddess”, “mermaid” or “woman in the wind” was common on some pieces of jewelry. 

Take a close look at it and let me know your thoughts, he is hoping to find out as much information as he can, quite honestly so am I. I'm attaching his YouTube video that was shot during this dig please feel free to view. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzalkCAmeYM




Sunday, March 20, 2016

Sunday Cemetery Annie Sullivan

Published the 16th of January in 1894 in the Sun out of Baltimore, MD
COLORED CENTENARIANS
Annie Sullivan Died at the Age of 109
Minnie Jefferson Living at 107
[Special Dispatch to the Baltimore Sun]
     NEW YORK, Jan. 15 – One-time slave Annie E. Sullivan died January 9 at the Colored Home and Hope at Sixty-fifth street and First avenue, at the age of one hundred and nine years. Her body was to buried in Potter’s field Saturday, when it was claimed at the morgue by her sixty-five-year-old son, Geo. Sullivan, who lives with the O’Dell Family at Hastings-on-the-Hudson. The son placed the body in St. Michael’s Cemetery, Long Island, yesterday.
     The aged colored woman was the daughter of Philip Pickering, who fought with Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox,” in the Revolution. She was born a slave in the Carroll family in 1735 and in later days often recalled visits made with her master and mistress to General Washington at Mount Vernon. By the dying request of her mistress she was given her freedom, and removed to Washington, where she entered the service of the Buchanan family. At a banquet given in Lafayette’s honor she was waiting upon the guests when the French General, stuck with pleasant manners spoke to her kindly. She was fond of recalling those recollections of her childhood. One of her brothers fought under Jackson at New Orleans. When Jackson became President this brother was made assistant gardener at the White House.
     She married in Washington and in XXXX moved to this city, John Garrison, of No. Old East One Hundred and Twenty-fourth street, was nursed by Mrs. Sullivan thirty years ago. He says there is no reason to doubt the truth of the woman’s great age. Her son at Hastings has a bible in which is a record of her birth. She entered the home about eighteen months ago and rarely spoke to any one, sitting bent double, with her head resting upon her knows, motionless. Her death was due to old age.
     A colored woman, named Minnie Jefferson who claims to be one hundred and seven years old, and that she was a slave born in Shenandoah Valley, VA. in the family of Thomas Jefferson when he was President of the United States, is now lying in a small room in the rear of the house No. 147 West Twenty-seventh street this city. She has now living four generations – three children, fifty-six grandchildren, eight great – grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Her eldest daughter, who was also born in the “Jefferson family, and who was named Caroline Jefferson, is seventy-seven years old, and when she was born her mother was thirty years of age.

     Her husband belonged to Daniel Taylor, who was one of the largest slaveowners of the revolutionary times. At the time of the surrender of Lord Cornwallis to General Washington the man she afterword married was a drummer-boy in the Continental army. Several years before the late war Granny Jefferson bought her freedom for $100. Her husband paid $450 for his freedom. The old woman has been confined to her bed since she lost her sight three years ago. She retains all of her other faculties. On January 23 a benefit will be given for her at St. Paul’s Colored Baptist Church in lower Seventh avenue. Her grandson, who is janitor at a factory, is her mainstay. 

Saturday, March 19, 2016

Saturday Spotting - Four Legged Pickpocket

Many of us spot some unusual things during our research. Some of the things we might view as a little on the strange side, funny, gross or even unusual. Most of the time some of these things we spot during our research have nothing to do with the individual we are actually researching, I know that’s the case with me, some of the time. Then I began to realize what might not be useful to my research might be useful to someone else. So that’s why I’ve came up with “Saturday Spotting’s”. My plan is to continue posting some of these unusual things that I’ve spotted during my research every Saturday. You will find everything from newspaper articles, photos, advertisements, obituaries’ and more. Hopefully some of you will find it useful if not just entertaining, enjoy. This article I found while doing some research  using Genealogy Bank.


Published the 17th of January in 1854 in the Delaware State Reporter out of Dover, DE

A MYSTERY SOLVED – Mr. Lamprey, of North Hampton, (N.H.) on retiring to rest some time since hung his coat, as was his custom, on the bed post. Next morning, having occasion to examine his wallet, which was in his pocket, several bills and half of a $5 were missing, for which he was unable to account, until a few days since Mrs. L, while heating her oven, discovered in the ash place a mouse next, in which she found three one-dollar bill, and fragments of other bills, with four young mice wrapped up in them.

Friday, March 18, 2016

Follow Friday


You never know what you might have missed while searching the web and reading all your messages that’s why I enjoy sharing some of these blogs. I’ve not listed them in any particular order just wanted so share some that caught my attention. Enjoy!

Southern Graves – “Myrtle Lawrence Southern Tenant Farmer Union Organizer (Women’s History Post)”
posted on March 16, 2016
posted by Stephanie Lincecum

'On a flesh and bone foundation': An Irish History -  "Those Places Thursday: The Wonderful Barn, Leixlip, County Kildare"
posted on March 10 2016
posted by Irisheyes Jennifer
Heirlooms Reunited - "1857-1862 Autograph Album, Presumably Owned by Laura V.F.Overlock of Waldoboro, Maine"
posted on March 16, 2016
posted by Pam Beveridge

The Lost Scrapbooks - “R.I.P. Billy Gallagher (1870-1934)  Part 1”
posted on February 25, 2016
posted by Jenny Lanctot

The Lost Scrapbooks - “R.I.P. Billy Gallagher (1870-1934) Part 2"
posted on February 29, 2016
posted by Jenny Lanctot

Ancestrial Breezes – “Where did Mom’s German go?”
posted on 24 April 2015  
posted  by Jen Baldwin