Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Going from Blogger Site to a Website

Making the Move from a Blogger Page to a Website

I want to thank all of you who have been following me on this blog page. I started a website a year ago and I'm ready to move everything over that way. Don't worry I'm still blogging and you can view new post and old ones on my website, ARodeskyGenealogy.com Please view the new website, like, share, comment and continue to view.
Essie Mae and her Sheep

Monday, May 22, 2017

Genealogy Conference and Education

Continuing your Genealogy and Family Research Education

Attending a genealogy conference is one of the most rewarding things you can do as a family researcher or professional genealogist. Not only will you benefit from the genealogy research education but you   can hear about the different areas and opportunities that are out there. Genealogy education is something that never ends. There are always new records being released, new repositories opening their doors and let’s not forget new websites to conduct your research.


There are several society conference and presentations coming up these next few months, here are a few you might want to check out.  

IGHR (Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research) on June 23-28  
Ontario Genealogical Society  on June 16-18  
BYU Conference on Family History on July 25  

Delaware
  • ·         Researching Military Records for Genealogy on June 10  
  • ·         Saving Family Treasures on July 2  
  • ·         Adventures in Research on Aug 6  

  • ·         Downstate Genealogy Society on June 10  

  • ·         Breaking Through Brick Walls on May 25  
  • ·         Beginners Intro to Learning About Genealogy on July 15  

Maryland
  • ·         Finding Overseas Origins of Your English Ancestors  on June 1 
  • ·         Reward and Remembrance: Post-Military Service Records on June 3  
  • ·         We are Maryland: Free Genealogy Workshop on Western Maryland on June 17  


Another bonus is all the networking you will be able to do, friends you’ll make and if you’re lucky meet some long-lost family members. 

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Saturday Spotting - Snow Storm Affects the Seventh Cavalry


Published on Friday the 18th of April in 1873 in the Sioux City Journal in Sioux City, Iowa
WIND AND SNOW
A Terrific Snow Storm at Yankton
Snow Bound Trains – Suffering of the
Seventh Cavalry – Rumored Loss of
Life, Esc.
From all the facts we have been able
to gather concerning the recent snow
storm that seems to have made Yankton
its center, we conclude the like of it has
never been experienced in the North
est. The storm commenced as a light
rain on the morning of the 13th inst, but
soon turned into snow, which continued
to fall lightly until about noon, when
the wind changed from the west to the
northwest and finally to the north, and
blew a perfect gale, accompanied by an
avalanche of snow.
The snow did not seem to fall in
flakes, but seemed to come down in a
 body which was separated into particles
 and dashed furiously in every direction.
The air was darkened by the snow, and
persons could not see five feet in any di-
rection.
The Dakota Southern passenger train
which left Sioux City Monday morning,
after worrying through the storm for
some time above Vermillion, finally ran
into a snow drift one mile and a half
above Gayville and stuck fast. The
freight, which was at Yankton, went to
the passengers’ relief, and managed to
get stuck in the same drift, where they
both remained until Wednesday evening.
The Seventh Cavalry fared very badly.
They had not yet completed their camp
arrangements, when the storm burst
upon them. Their tents were blown
down, and drifts of snow formed so
rapidly, and the storm was so furious,
that the men could do nothing to pro-
tect themselves. Men and horses were
buried up in the snow, and general con-
fusion and not a little consternation
prevailed everywhere. The officers
sought shelter and the hotels, and some of
the men followed their example by
seeking the hospitalities of private
houses, indeed, protection from the storm
wherever they could find it. Many of
the soldiers, however, did not fare thus
fortunately. They remained buried in
the snow until relief came to them from
the town. They were dug out of the
snow and hauled to more comfortable
quarters on hand-sleds. Many of them
were exposed for thirty six hours, and
when rescued were weak and exhausted,
and wept like children. It is said that
these poor fellows presented a most
pitiable appearance, which was well
calculated to excite the sympathies of
the most indifferent heart. And many
kind and generous hands responded
promptly to their wants. Up to last
reports quite a number of men were
still unaccounted for, and it is
not known whether they have
perished or have wandered off
in the storm and are still suffering in
some snow drift. What has been said
of the sufferings of the men is reported
true of the horses. Some were removed
to stables by great effort, others re-
mained tied and were drifted under, and
some broke loose and wandered off and
had not been recovered at last accounts
General Custer, who is regarded as
good authority, said in the presence of
our informant, that it was the worst
storm in every particular, excepting in-
tensely Cold, that he ever experienced
in his life. This seems to be the testimony
of everyone who witnessed the storm. In
many places the drifts in and about
Yankton were twenty feet high. They
had to cut down and dig as into a cellar,
to get into some of the stores. To con-
vey some sort of correct idea of the
avalanche of snow that fell it need only
be stated that on the river, in less than
three hours after the real violence of
the storm set in, there were six inches of
snow and slush floating.
The southern limit of the heavy snow
 fall on the Missouri River was about
eighty rods below Vermillion, where the
line was as distinct as a ridge of snow
could make it.
We shall rejoice if the losses which are
 conjectured to have resulted from the
storm prove really less than one can
hardly hope for.
We endeavored to reach Yankton last
evening by telegraph in order to present
 in connection with this report any later
 developments that might have been
made since morning, but could get nothing.

(*above article located on the Genealogy Bank website) 


Thursday, May 18, 2017

Presentation - Records? What Records?


The number of records you can find while doing your research can be overwhelming. Knowing what information they hold, the stories they share about your ancestors. While giving this presentation I address all of that and so much more.    

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday - Jewell Family

  

ABRAM JEWELL
1873 – 1932
HIS WIFE
SUSIE FORD 1870-1943



 MOTHER
SARAH
WIFE OF
JOHN JEWELL
DIED
SEPT 20, 1915
AGED 79 YEARS

ELIAS HAMILTON
DIED
AUG. 12 1913
AGED 67 YEARS
JEWELL


[1]1880 United States Federal Census from West Dover Hundred, County of Kent, State of Delaware shows John Jewel as head of household, married, white, male, born in Delaware. It doesn’t list where both of his parents were born. It shows his occupation as a Farmer; he was 68 years of age at the time of this census. Sarah Jewell is wife to head of household, married, white, female, born in Delaware, both parents were born in Delaware. It shows her occupation as keeping house; she was 43 years of age. John Jewell is son to head of household, white, male, born in Delaware, fathers birth place is unknown, mothers birth place is Delaware. It shows no occupation; he was 20 years of age at the time of this census. Mary Bell Jewel is listed as daughter to head of household, white, female, born in Delaware, fathers birth place is unknown, mothers birth place is Delaware. It shows no occupation; she was 17 years of age at the time of this census. Anne Catherine Jewell is listed as daughter to head of household, white, female, born in Delaware, fathers place of birth is unknown, mothers place of birth is Delaware. It shows no occupation; she was 14 years of age at the time of this census. Harvey Jewell is listed as son to head of household, white, male, born in Delaware, fathers place of birth is unknown, mothers place of birth is Delaware. It shows no occupation; he was 9 years of age at the time of this census. Abraham Jewell is listed as son to head of household, white, male, born in Delaware, fathers place of birth is unknown, mothers place of birth is Delaware. It shows no occupation; he was 7 years of age at the time of this census. David Jewell is listed as son to head of household, white, male, born in Delaware, fathers place of birth is unknown, mothers place of birth is Delaware. It shows no occupation; he was 3 years of age at the time of this census. Elias Hamilton laborer to head of household, white, male, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows laborer as occupation; he was 31 years of age at the time of this census. James Russell laborer to head of household, white, male, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows laborer as occupation; he was 24 years of age at the time of this census.




[2]1900 United States Federal Census from Saint Georges, County of New Castle, State of Delaware shows Calias Hamilton as head of household, single, white, male, born January 1878 in Delaware, both parents were born in Delaware. It shows his occupation as a Farmer; he was 52 years of age at the time of this census. Sarah Jewell is listed as House Keeper to head of household, widowed, white, female, born March 1837 in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation; she had been married for 31 years, mothered 4 children, 2 children living, she was 63 years of age at the time of this census.  Abram Jewell is listed as step brother to head of household, single, white, male, born March 1873 in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows occupation as farm laborer; he was 27 years old at the time of this census. David Jewell is listed as step brother to head of household, single, white, male, born January 1877 in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows occupation as farm laborer; he was 23 years of age at the time of this census.




[3]1910 United States Federal Census from District 13, County of New Castle, State of Delaware shows Elias Hamilton as head of household, male, white, single, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows his occupation as a Farmer; he was 61 years of age at the time of this census.  Sarah Jewell as step mother to head of household, female, white, widowed, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation; she was 72 years of age at the time of this census, mother of 10 children, 9 children still living. Abraham Jewell listed as step brother to head of household, male, white, married, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows occupation as farm laborer; married for 2 years, he was 37 years of age at the time of this census. Susan Jewell listed as step daughter in law to head of house hold, female, white, married, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation; married for 2 years, she was 37 years of age at the time of this census, mother of 2 children, 1 child still living.  Grace R Jewell is listed as step granddaughter in law, female, white, single, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation; she was 1 year and 10 months at the time of this census.  David L Jewell listed at step brother to head of household, male, white, single, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows occupation as farm laborer;  he was 30 years of age at the time of this census.




[4]1920 United States Federal Census from District 13, County of New Castle, State of Delaware shows Abraham Jewell as head of household, male, white, married, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows his occupation as a Farmer; he was 46 years of age at the time of this census. Susie Jewell is listed as wife to head of household, female, white, married, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation; she was 44 years of age at the time of this census. Grace Jewell is listed as daughter to head of household, female, white, single, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation; she was 11 years of age at the time of this census. Garfield Lewis is listed as servant to head of household, male, black, single, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows Farm Laborer as occupation; he was 28 years of age at the time of this census.




[5]1930 United States Federal Census from District 13, County of New Castle, State of Delaware shows Abram Jewell as head of household, male, white, married, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows his occupation as a Farmer; pays rent for his home, he married at 31 years of age, he was 58 years of age at the time of this census. Susie Jewell is listed as the wife to head of household, female, white, married, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows no occupation, she married at 26 years of age, she was 53 years of age at the time of this census. Grace Jewell is listed as daughter to head of household, female, white, single, born in Delaware, both parents born in Delaware. It shows Housework as occupation; she was 21 years of age at the time of this census.  William Robinson is listed as laborer to head of household, male, negro, married, born in Virginia, both parents born in Virginia. It shows laborer as occupation; he was 59 years of age at the time of this census. Nowland Webb is listed as laborer to head of household, male, negro, single, born in Maryland, both parents born in Maryland. I shows laborer as occupation; he was 24 years of age at the time of this census.


[1] 1880 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. West Dover, Kent, Delaware; Roll: 116: Family History Film: 1254116; Page: 95C; Enumeration District: 036; Image: 0192. NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls. 
[2] 1900 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Saint Georges, New Castle, Delaware; Roll: 157; Page: 24A: Enumeration District: 0063; FHL microfilm: 1240157. National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.  
[3]1910 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Roll: T624_146; Page: 6A; Enumerations District: 0096; FHL microfilm: 137419. NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls.    
[4] 1920 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Roll: T625_204; Page: 8A; Enumerations District: 172; Image 460. NARA microfilm T625,2076 rolls.

[5] 1930 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Roll:287; Page: 13B; Enumerations District: 0119; Image:885.0; FHL microfilm: 2340022 NARA 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.  

Monday, May 15, 2017

ARodesky Genealogy Donation to the Ruritan Club


Carolyn Stanley and Charlotte Miller pictured above

     I’m sure many of you have heard of clubs like the Lions, Kiwanis and even the Rotary Club. Earlier last month a lady contacted me from the local Appoquinimink Ruritan Club about a fundraiser they were having for local high school scholarships, MOT Big Ball and Kay’s Kamp.  I remembered meeting with her during the Middletown Area Chamber of Commerce Business Expo and discussing some research on her family. The Ruritan Club was going to be having a live and silent auction to raise money for the above mentioned and even more. It sounded as if most of the money would be going to the high school scholarships and I’m all for education, I have four children. But I needed to learn a little more about this organization, so I did what any good business owner would do and did a little research. As I said I’m all for education but again my business is “genealogy and family research” so I felt I needed to find out a little more. So here is a quick overview of what the Ruritan National is all about, just in case you haven’t ever heard of them and how they help some communities.  

The purpose of the club is to offer community service to the needs of their “own” community and they work to meet those needs through fundraisers like the auction. You find most if not all the clubs are in small towns and rural areas throughout the United States. They not only support their local 4-H Chapters, FFA and Boy Scouts but also athletic programs and help with the sick and needy. The first club was charted in 1928 in Holland, Virginia. Appoquinimink Ruritan Club has been in the community since 1991 and their efforts in supporting the community has been ongoing.  

    I could continue, trust me, but I’m sure many of you are wanting to know how this type of organization works with my business. Well the first should be the education, I feel all businesses should support education at some point the other would have to be FFA, Future Farmers of America. How many times have I looked at a census record and seen “farmer” listed in occupation. Farming was and still is one of those occupations that are the foundation for building families, homes and businesses.  Now after finding out how my business can support this organization I need to 1) decide what my business can offer 2) what are the benefits for my business.  I decided that my “Basic Research Package” would be a good match, especially since this is my first time associated with the organization and if it’s well received then I might increase my donation package next year. When I originally donated the package, I was under the impression it was for the silent auction but was presently surprised to see it was placed in the live auction. The benefit that my business received was the advertisement, I could lay out business cards along with some rack cards on the table where community members entered. I was also invited to attend the event, meet some members of the club and community and discuss ARodesky Genealogy.

    I must add I did have a wonderful time and quit a few laughs with the auctioneer and how he was able to charm the bidders to increase their bids. After it was all over I had the opportunity to meet two of the organizers of the event and the winner of my donation.


Saturday, May 13, 2017

Saturday Spotting - Heir of the Valentine Estate Weds

Appeared on Saturday the 23rd of October in 1875 in the Indianapolis Sentinel out of Indianapolis, Indiana

WEDDED WEALTH.

TWO VAST ESTATES UNITED BY THE TENDER TIE OF HUSBAND AND WIFE.

     The Fall River correspondent of the New
York Herald contributed the following to
Wednesday’s issue of that paper: The mar-
riage of Miss Ella E. Valentine and Walter
M. Green, so long the theme of social
interest in this city, came of the evening at
the Valentine mansion, which had been
most elaborately decorated for the occasion.
The event called together a large company of
personal friends form their vicinity and the
large cities. Miss Valentine is the young-
est heir to the great Valentine estate, which
has descended to the heirs of the fourth
generation, the ancestor bequeathing it hav-
ing survived all his children and
passing it over the head of his
grandson about thirty-six years ago.
The aggregate at the present would place
it among the largest fortunes in the land,
and a very large portion of it is still invested
in established enterprises that have greatly
enriched this city. Mr. W M. Green is the
son of a wealthy merchant of Providence,
whose fortune places him among the solid
men of that city. The interior of the man-
sion where the ceremony was performed
was splendidly decorated with fortunes of
roses, smilax and fern. The wedding
ceremony took place under a finely
wrought arch of flowers with.
A FLORAL CROWN IN THE CENTER.
The refectory, improvised for the occasion
outside of domicile, was rendered very
attractive and beautiful with its profusion
of flowers and splendor of illuminations.
The lawn in front of the mansion was also
illuminated with about thirty glass globes
and stars lit up with gas. An arbor was
built from the front door to the sidewalk,
and the latter was carpeted to the street.
A steamer was charted to bring the guest
from Providence, and at the hour appointed
for the ceremony there were about 800
spectators. The ceremony was performed
by the Rev. A.K. P. Small, of the First
Baptist Church, in a very impressive man-
ner, and many were the congratulations
showered upon the happy pair. The music
for the occasion was rendered by an
orchestra from Providence. The presents
were numerous, elaborate in design and
combined the useful and beautiful In-
cluded in the display were statuettes,
candlesticks, engravings, chromos, tea and
dinner sets, and lastly a pair of solitaire
diamond ear drops, a present from the
bridegroom to this bride; a magnificent chro-
nometer with Swiss watch chain and pend-
ants, valued at $1,000, a present from the
bride to her husband. The newly married
couple left this evening for San Francisco,

where they purpose to spend the winter

(*above article found on Genealogy Bank website)

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Presentation - Researching From the Couch



When giving this presentation I hear some interesting responses from those who have always "researched old school" their words. I agree completely that you can't complete your research sitting at home on the computer. But some find it a good place to start before they head out the door. So with this presentation I show you how to research on the internet, including some sites that you might not have visited yet, and some helpful tools for maneuvering around them.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday - Samuel Moore


SAMUEL E.
MOORE
TENNESSEE
1890

DECEMBER 3, 1923


[1]Certificate of Death in Clarksville, Montgomery County, State of Tennessee. Samial Moore date of birth 1890 in Kansas, occupation listed as common labor. Parents were Samial E. Moore with Tennessee listed as place of birth, Sue Eldridge with Tennessee listed as place of birth. Male, colored, single. Date of death December 3, 1932, his age at the time of death was 33 years. Cause of death is listed as acute gastritis. Burial is listed Clarksville, Tennessee in Golden Hill Cemetery, date of burial December 5, 1923. The informant listed Vinner Wylie of Clarksville, Tennessee.



[2]Application for headstone for Samuel E. More #2436484, Private C Company 813-Pio. Inf. World War Veteran from Tennessee, date of death December 3, 1923, cemetery Golden Hill in Clarksville, Tennessee. Headstone was shipped to Diana Julie Wylie in Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee.



[1] Tennessee, Deaths and Burials Index, 1874-1955 Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2011.  
[2]Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963 Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com:  accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2012. Microfilm publication M1916, 134 rolls. ARC ID: 596118. Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Record Group 92, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C.

Monday, May 8, 2017

Business Donations...How Do You Choose?



     How many times as a business owner have you received a letter, email, phone call or even a face to face meeting about your business supporting a community or school cause.  Over the last two months I have received some of those communications and it’s hard to decide where and what we as business owners can do to support those in our community. I’m a small business owner and money isn’t always available and my time does equal money. So, I’ve had to look at every donation request as a request for money and where mine is better spent for my business and for my community. Yeah that’s not easy and is a mouth full.

     I was told by a fellow genealogist that I needed to always consider what type of business I have and make those donations that fit into my business. For instance, as a genealogist if I’m approached about supporting a local comic book club how does that fit. I could find a way to twist it around and make it fit but it doesn’t work, now if I was an artist and wanted to donate a piece of art then great. That would be a hand down perfect fit.


     Over the next few Monday’s I’m going to share some of those organizations in my community that have requested support. I will share with you my experience with them.  The events themselves and not only what they received but what I received also.  Even in business it’s a two-way street and sometimes we need to think a little outside of that box to not only help our business but help those around us. It feels good so think about it and give it a try.  

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Sunday Cemetery - General Henry Van Ness Boynton

Published on the 8th of June in 1905 in the Baltimore American out of Baltimore, MD
BURIED WITH MILITARY HONORS
GENERAL BOYNTON NOW RESTS AT ARLINGTON CEMETERY
A Funeral Befitting the Rank of a Brigadier General – The Services Held at New York Ave. Presbyterian Church – Representatives Present From Gridiron Club – Remains Taken to Cemetery on a Gun Caisson – Salute of Eleven Guns From Fort Myer.
     Washington, June 7 – Gen. Henry Van Ness Boynton was buried today in Arlington National Cemetery with distinctive military and civic honors. Although a civilian at the time of his death, he was accorded a funeral befitting an office of the rank he at one time held in the United States Army, that of brigadier general. The funeral services, which took place at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, were conducted by Rev. Dr. Wallace Radcliffe and were participated in by a numerous representation of the Society of the Army of the Cumberland, the Loyal Legion and the Gridiron Club, in all of which organizations General Boynton had for many years past been a leading spirit.
     The funeral services were unostentatious, being in strict accord with the wishes of the deceased. The church ceremony consisted principally of an eulogy by Dr. Radcliffe and the singing of two hymns by the Gridiron Club Quartet. Dr. Radcliffe’s eulogy was an eloquent review of the career of a lifelong friend. The floral tributes were many and of varied design, the casket being literally buried in masterpieces of the florist’s art.
     Among the tributes was large floral wreath sent by the city of Chattanooga, where General Boynton was well-known, and a delegation of whose citizens attended the funeral, President Roosevelt, in expressing sympathy to Gen. Andrew S. Burt, Chairman of the committee representing the Army of the Cumberland in the funeral arrangements, took occasion to pay a high tribute to the character and public services of General Boynton, saying that he regarded him as the highest type of a soldier and a citizen, and one of the best examples of patriotic American manhood.
     At the conclusion of the church services two troops of cavalry escorted the remains, which rested on a gun caisson, with artillery sergeants as body bearers,  to their resting place in the historic Arlington. As the funeral cortege passed Fort Myer a brigadier general’s salute of 11 guns was fired and the last military honors were rendered by a volley over the distinguished soldier and citizen’s grave.
     General Boynton, up to within a few weeks of his death, had been president of the Board of Education of the District of Columbia, and as a tribute to his memory the public schools were closed for the day. The flag on all District buildings were placed at half staff.
     The pallbearers, eight in number, selected by the General before his death form the Gridiron Blub, introduced an innovation. Each member of the club wore a boutonniere of lavender sweet peas, tied with black and white ribbons, the colors of the blub. At the Arlington Cemetery, after Dr. Radcliffe, the officiating clergyman, had pronounced the benediction over the open grave, the eight Gridiron pallbearers advanced and unpinning the flowers from their coats, dropped them in upon the casket as a last tribute to the memory of their fellow member.


Saturday, May 6, 2017

Saturday Spotting - St.Valentine's Ball in Cleveland




Appeared on Friday the 15th of February in 1889 in the Knoxville Journal out of Knoxville, Tennessee

FROM CLEVELAND.
Unexpected Wedding…Going to the Inau-
guration…Hall in Honor of St. Val-
entine…. Boughs Paint the
Town Red.

CLEVELAND, February 14, - Another
very unexpected wedding occurred last
night. The contracting parties were Mr.
William Cate, a prominent citizen of this
place, and Mrs. Fannie Hancock, widow
of the late James Hancock. The mar-
riage took place at the splendid resi-
dence of the bride, on Berry street, Rev.
A.J. Duncan officiating.
Quite a number of Clevelanders will
take in the inauguration. The following
gentlemen have expressed their inten-
tion of being present, as taken form the
Herald: H. J. Parks, T.D. Steed, T.M.
Montgomery, J.H. Gaut, H.W. Horner,
L. D. Campbell, F.D. Clark, G.B. Cate,
J.A. Denton, M.L. Julian and Gus
Cate. The St. Valentine ball at the opera-
house last night was a very delightful
affair, and was well attended. The mu-
sic was excellent and every one pro-
nounced the affairs a grand success. The
elegant costumes of the ladies were espe-
cially commented upon, and the young
gentlemen were splendidly attired.
Among those who participated were:
Mr. F.T. Hall, Miss Agnes Hartdegen,
Mr.Will Sebring, Misss Lucille Bennitt,
Mr. s.J. Rogers, Miss Lula Carter, Mr.
L.S. Kelley, Miss Annie Sharp, Mr. W.
F. Marshall, Misses Nellie McConnell
and Tillie Gray, Mr. Will Johnston,
Miss Kelley, Mr. J.N. Davis, Miss Fan-
nie Craigmiles, Mr. Charles price, Mrs.
Emma Steed, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wil-
liams, Mr.and Mrs. Walter Cragmiles,
Mr. Luke Williams, of Knoxville; H. S.
Tipton, Fred Newell, Freman Surguine
and Will Gaut.
Mr.F. P. Kanister, is preparing to
build a residence in North Cleveland.
There is trouble brewing in the public
school, it seems between one of the
teachers, the principle and the school
board. It is to be hoped that the trouble
will be amicably settled at once.
A gang of rough characters, evidently
drank,”painted the town red” last night,
by tearing up steps, breaking down
fences, smashing up street lamps, etc.
The city officers are looking into the
matter, and if they are found out they
ought to be punished in such a way that
will forever stamp out such outrageous
conduct.
Hon. John Devor, who was the repub-
lican elector for the fourth district of
Ohio during the last campaign, is in the
city visiting his estimable wife, who has
been in the city during the past two
months for her health. Mr. Devor is
perfectly delighted with our little city,
and we hope tat he may conclude to
make it his permanent home.
Arrivals at the Hatcher House to-day:
Jno, f. Sprager, Baltimore; S.J. Samre,
Cincinnati, O.O. Jones, Selma, Ala; H.
Rose, New York: T.C. Long, West
Chester, Pa.;N. P. Cannon, Atlanta,
Ge; O.C. Waller, Union Springs, Ga.,
J.J. Boyd, New York; Rev. Jos. J.
Jones, Georgia; J. A. Quitman, Atlanta,
Ga.


(*above article found on Genealogy Bank website)

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Presentation - Cemetery Quick Finds




There are so many wonderful things we can learn about out ancestors when we include a visit to the cemetery in our research. Not only do we see dates and names but you might also find information about their career or even an organization they belonged to.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday - Peterson Family




GEORGE W.
PETERSON
1841-1916

ALICE S.
WIFE OF
GEORGE W. PETERSON
1859-1934


[1]George W Peterson issued marriage license on 15 December 1895 in the state of Delaware. Payment of two hundred dollars was made by George W. Peterson and John R. Gallagher on said date for the marriage license. This was issued for the marriage between George W. Peterson and Alice S. Adams.




[2]1900 United States Federal Census from the state of Delaware, County of New Castle and town of Middletown shows George W Peterson as head of household married, white, male, was born March 1841 in New Jersey, both of his parents were born in New Jersey. It also shows that his occupation was listed as a Black Smith; he owns his home and he was 59 years of age at the time of this census. Alice Peterson listed as wife to head of household, married, white, female, was born September 1860 in Maryland, both of her parents were born in Maryland. It also shows she was the mother of one child and said child is living, her occupation was listed as a dress maker; she was 39 years of age at the time of this census. Minnie A Peterson listed as adopted daughter to head of household, single, white, female, was born Dec 1884 in Pennsylvania, both of her parents were born in Pennsylvania. It shows no occupation; she was 16 years of age at the time of this census. Marion Nock is listed as boarder to head of household, single, white, female, was born Dec 1884 in Maryland, both of her parents were born in Maryland. It shows that her occupation was Millinery train; she was 25 years of age at the time of this census.



[3]1910 United States Federal Census from the state of Delaware, County of New Castle and town of Middletown shows George W Peterson as head of household, married, white, male, he was born in New Jersey, both of his parents were born in New Jersey. It also shows that his occupation was listed as Black Smith; he owns his home mortgage free, he was 69 years of age at the time of this census and in his current mirage for 14 years. Alice M Peterson listed as wife to head of household, married, white, female, she was born in Maryland, both of her parents were born in Maryland. Her occupation was listed as Merchant Retail with dry goods she was 49 years of age at the time of this census and in her current marriage for 14 years. Goldie I. Vashell listed as boarder to head of household, single, white, female, she was born in Delaware, both of her parents were born in Delaware. It also shows that her occupation was listed as Saleslady; she was 17 years of age at the time of this census. Pearl H. Guessford listed as boarder to head of household, single, white, female, she was born in Delaware, both of her parents were born in Delaware. It also shows that her occupation was listed as Saleslady; she was 20 years of age at the time of this census.


[4]1920 United States Federal Census from the State of Delaware, County of New Castle and town of Middletown on East Main Street Alice S Peterson is listed as head of household, widowed, white, female, she was born in Maryland, both parents were born in Maryland. It also shows her occupation as Proprietress at Electrical store; she was 60 years of age at the time of this census.




[5]Certificate of Death in Middletown, New Castle County, State of Delaware. George W. Peterson date of birth May 17, 1916 in New Jersey, no occupation listed. Parents are Jeremiah Peterson born in New Jersey and Dawn R??? born in New Jersey. Male, white, married. Date of death May 17, 1916, his age at the time of death was 75 years. Cause of death is listed as Angina Pectoris. Burial is listed Middletown, Delaware in Forest Cemetery, date of burial May 20, 1916. The informant listed Mrs. A. S. Peterson.





[1]Delaware, Marriage Records, 1744-1912 Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.  Dover, Delaware: Delaware Public Archives. Record Group #RG 1325; Subgroup #003; Series#004.
[2] 1900 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Anetry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Roll: 157; Page 8A; Enumeration District; 0063; FHL microfilm; 1240157. National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
[3]1910 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Middletown, New Castle, Delaware; Roll: T624_146; Page: 5A Enumeration District: 0095; FHL microfilm:1374159. NARA microfilm publication T624,1,178 rolls.
[4] 1920 United States Federal Census Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Middletown, New Castle, Delaware; Roll: T625_204; Page:7A; Enumeration District: 171; Image:425. NARA microfilm publication T625,2076 rolls.
[5]Delaware Death Records 1811-1933 Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 April 2017) Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010. Original data: Delaware, Delaware Vital Records. Microfilm, Delaware Public Archives, Dover.